Forest schools

Published on Saturday, 18 January 2014

What Happens At A Forest School

A Forest School develops by individuals in a setting becoming qualified Forest School Practitioners or drawing down funding to bring in an organisation that specialises in the delivery of Forest School programmes.

what-happens-at-a-forest-school1Initially projects run from their own grounds/gardens/playing fields (where appropriate) allowing the children to become comfortable with an outdoor approach to education and play whilst in familiar surroundings. Allowing relationships based around trust and self-exploration to develop with the Forest School Leaders who start to facilitate a more child led outdoor curriculum when the group are ready they familiarise themselves with the route to the wood either on foot or by bus. The group then have their introductory sessions in the woodland exploring the site establishing physical and behavioral boundaries. Safety procedures, hygiene and routines.

Once a group are established in the woodland and routines are set up the project develops through a child led approach with opportunities for projects being taken back to the indoor setting to be continued.

Meeting Basic needs

It is fundamental that Children’s basic needs are met before any higher learning can take place (Maslow’s Pyramid of Hierarchical Needs).
Warmth – correct clothing provided
Food- Health Snacks and meals
Drink – Hydrated water /hot drinks
Safe – individuals feel safe both physically and emotionally

The Forest Schools Site

what-happens-at-a-forest-school2Each Forest School site is unique; you design it to meet the needs of the group and to fit the environment you are working in, usually in negotiation with your woodland owner. (All safety guidelines for site construction can be found in the practical handbook available to buy from www.muddyfaces.com).
The site will be constructed in a clearing or cleared area of the woodland, this way will keep your children as safe as possible whilst giving opportunities to explore and discover other areas of more dense ground flora, such as brambles and overhead hazards. Children will grow stronger physically, become more balanced and coordinated.

Your site could range in complexity from no fixed features to a fully constructed shelter and fire area with specially designed areas for hygiene, creative art, tool use, fast games, throwing games, water collection, flora monitoring amongst other ideas.

When you start to plan the building of your site, you will have a circle area for seating made from wooden benches to surround your fire pit, if you can have one. Wind breaks around the benches will provide protection from the wind and to create a cozy, enclosed area for a calm time around the fire area. These are fabulous to build with your children, no matter how old they are and they link to every schema you can think of! Make a group shelter from a tarp or an army parachute by putting up winch to pull up a waterproof roof for any downpours and to store kit under. A more permanent construction will take longer and be more rewarding and appropriate for some groups.
A network of people and groups supporting forest schools often develop a mutually beneficial partnership between different groups. In a couple of our Archimedes Forest school Sites older groups have constructed sites for kindergarten groups to use They have built small people benches and hanging artwork in the trees. This has given a focus to the older groups and created a magical space for the younger groups that is safe and effective.

(www.forestschools.com,2014)